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Simulating Life on Mars on a Hawaiian Volcano with @casey_stedman and @spincrisis

To see more daily life on sMars in Hawaii, follow @casey_stedman and @spincrisis on Instagram, and browse the #HISEAS hashtag.

Forty-five years after first setting foot on the Moon, humanity has set its eyes on Mars. In Hawaii, a team of “sMartians” (simulated Martians) is already practicing for life on a distant planet.

US Air Force Major Casey Stedman (@casey_stedman) is the Mission Commander for HISEAS (Hawaii-Space Exploration and Analog Simulation), an isolated “habitat module” on the volcanic island. “I haven’t seen a tree, smelled the rain, heard a bird, or felt wind on my skin in four months,” he says, describing life on the site chosen for its similarity to Mars.

"You don’t really think about the tactical feedback you get from biting into crisp lettuce and a juicy hamburger, but that’s the one thing that’s lacking here," says Chief Technologist Ross Lockwood (@spincrisis), describing “sMartian” cuisine, which is packed for months of storage. “We’ve basically been subsisting on mush. Flavorful mush, but mush nonetheless. That’s actually one of my favorite parts of Instagram during the mission: all those pictures of food are helping me get through.”

amnhnyc:

Astronomers have long pondered the origins of enormous elliptical galaxies in the young Universe. An object 11 billion light-years away spotted by the Herschel mission may help unravel the mystery. 
Two massive spiral galaxies merged to create a giant elliptical galaxy, which were previously believed to form through the absorption of dwarf galaxies over time. 
Learn more about this finding in a Science Bulletin video. 

amnhnyc:

Astronomers have long pondered the origins of enormous elliptical galaxies in the young Universe. An object 11 billion light-years away spotted by the Herschel mission may help unravel the mystery. 

Two massive spiral galaxies merged to create a giant elliptical galaxy, which were previously believed to form through the absorption of dwarf galaxies over time. 

Learn more about this finding in a Science Bulletin video

(via spaceplasma)

ohstarstuff:

"For as long as there been humans we have searched for our place in the cosmos. Where are we? Who are we? We find that we live on an insignificant planet of a hum-drum star lost in a galaxy tucked away in some forgotten corner of a universe in which there are far more galaxies than people. This perspective is a courageous continuation of our penchant for constructing and testing mental models of the skies; the Sun as a red-hot stone, the stars as a celestial flame, the Galaxy as the backbone of night." – CARL SAGAN 

(Photography credit: Michael Goh)

(via the-actual-universe)

"Why do we even bother? Why do we make ourselves so open to such easy damage? Is it all loneliness? Is it all fear? Or is it just to experience those narcotic moments of belonging with someone else?"
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(Source: wordsthat-speak, via wordsthat-speak)